An Ayurvedic Approach to Illness

How does Ayurveda cure illnesses?

This article explores the Ayurvedic approach to treating Illness. Once the dosha has been determined, the present illness or health concern is discussed. Through a series of questions regarding the degree of air, fire, and water affecting the condition, the condition will become clear. It is more crucial to learn what the patient experiences than merely naming the illness. Another way of cross-referencing disease is finding the site of the condition. For example, dryness, or general weakness in the colon, bones, and thighs; anxieties; and worry are symptoms of Váta. Heat, infection or acid of the liver, spleen, heart, blood,
gall bladder; yellow or green mucus, anger, impatience, and irritability are symptoms of Pitta. With dampness, water (e.g., in the lungs), white or clear, abundant mucus, overweight, and lethargy, Kapha is the cause. If symptoms include more than one dosha, then it is possible that both doshas are the cause.

Investigating an illness

Different physical and mental imbalances may exist. The practitioner investigates “the cause of the cause.” For example, if a person wants to lose weight, therapy can begin in one of three ways. First, one may address the symptom with allopathic weight loss pills. Obviously, this is the most superficial method. Second, one may realize that the cause of the weight is a Kapha tendency and follow appropriate Kapha-reduction therapies. Yet, a deeper level still exists. What is the cause of the overeating? Perhaps it is an Váta-imbalanced mind, producing worry or anxiety. Kapha imbalances create a need for love and contentment. These factors may cause a person to eat more.

Understanding the underlying causes of an Illness

When viewing weight gain from another vantage point, finding out what causes anxiety in the person may uncover dharmic (life-purpose), kamic (spiritual relationship), or spiritual situations, that are making the person unhappy.

Therapies include herbs and foods to reduce weight, calm the mind, and culture the heart. Sádhaná (meditation)
is also advised to develop inner calm and Selflove. When viewing weight gain from another vantage point, finding out what causes anxiety in the person may uncover dharmic (life-purpose), kamic (spiritual relationship), or spiritual situations, that are making the person unhappy. The dharmic reasons are easily discovered when asking patients if they love the career in which they are presently working. They specifically need to say they love it. When they acknowledge that they do, the practitioner can focus more deeply into kama and Self-Realization questioning.

Often patients realize that once, before they stopped doing something they loved, they did not have a weight problem.

If they admit they are unhappy with their careers, a deeper question is asked; “What is it you would love to do if you could, regardless whether it seems possible or practical?” Often patients realize that once, before they stopped doing something they loved, they did not have a weight problem. Only after they stopped doing what they love (e.g., teaching dancing) did the weight gain occur. Thus, the practitioner uncovers the ultimate cause of the weight problem.

The path to recovery

People doing what they love to do find their lives will transform themselves in a very short time.

People doing what they love to do find their lives will transform themselves in a very short time. Spiritual lacking is yet another dimension that may cause overeating and overweight. It is the cause of all causes of diseases. An inner lack of fulfillment may exist in one’s career, relationship or in their self worth. These persons should begin taking small steps towards involving themselves in whatever they need for inner nourishment.

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